majorjohnandre:

Turn: Of Cabbages and Kings

Go New Jersey

(via patsyjefferson)

majorjohnandre:

Turn: Of Cabbages and Kings

Go New Jersey

(via patsyjefferson)

"No occupation is so delightful to me as the culture of the earth, no culture comparable to that of the garden…But though an old man, I am but a young gardener."
-Thomas Jefferson (via quoteallthethings)
"Laws that forbid the carrying of arms … disarm only those who are neither inclined nor determined to commit crimes."
hillbillyplease:

https://twitter.com/shrillcosby/status/504816186672963584
This series of tweets is the greatest thing that ever happened. There are several more, and they are all beautiful.

hillbillyplease:

https://twitter.com/shrillcosby/status/504816186672963584

This series of tweets is the greatest thing that ever happened. There are several more, and they are all beautiful.

http://publius-esquire.tumblr.com/post/96068153605/sometimes-one-has-to-remind-people-that

publius-esquire:

Sometimes one has to remind people that historically-speaking, antislavery was not synonymous with pro-black. From the Federal Era to the Civil War, antislavery arguments could be summarized into three different grounds of opposition: humanitarian (“slavery is wrong”); racist (“slavery brings…

35 Founding Father Quotes Conservative Christians Will Hate

petersimonova:

foundingfatherfest:

awomaninvisible:

Fascinating. This is what the US is supposed to be like. 

(I should point out, I’m not American, but the article is)

All these quotes look accurate. I’m seeing some I’d never seen before, though, which is neat.

Don’t mistake the Founders for a bunch of hardcore atheists who hated religion, though. This is why it’s hard to compare religious issues today to those of their time. Christianity was woven deeply into the culture, and pretty much everyone, Deist or not, went to church.

And after Thomas Paine wrote this ill-advised pamphlet…

31. “Persecution is not an original feature in any religion; but it is always the strongly marked feature of all religions established by law. Take away the law-establishment, and every religion re-assumes its original benignity.”
~Thomas Paine, The Rights of Man, 1791

Just about everyone hated him.

But yeah, the separation of church and state thing is one of my favorite things about the US! Remember a great account from a French guy, talking about how even family members might go to different churches and it wasn’t a big deal. Yay for religious diversity.

1st amendment: “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances”

As a conservative christian i love this. They saw what Catholics and Anglicans had done to Europe with state sponsored religion and didn’t want that to happen here, this is why we have been a haven for European religious minorities like Protestants and Jews.

But yeah, the separation of church and state thing is one of my favorite things about the US!

So sorry, Jefferson wrote a letter in 1802 (not a constitutional amendment but a letter) to the Baptists of Danbury, Connecticut, that there should be “a wall of separation between church and state.”

This was written to a church in defense of the 1st amendment phrase “no law respecting an establishment of religion” not a statement asking for sterile separation, but a defense against the idea of state sponsored religion.

This public letter has long been taken by the left as law. While they ignore actual law. And this is the only place where the left respects the concept of “original intent.”even if it is in a backhanded way stretched beyond credibility

And slavery? the 3/5ths man clause was insisted on by the democrat states and their politicians, not christian conservatives but largely German Catholic southern states. We will address this more later.

Uh, yeah. I know that Jefferson wrote that in a letter. It’s still the term generally used to describe the relationship between government and religion in the US.

…And what does the 3/5th clause  have to do with religion? Like…nothing. Southerns wanted to have their slaves counted as population because it would be advantageous to their states. If all of the slaveholders in the south were scientologists they’d have wanted the same thing.

"I know not how to mention, the melancholly Intelligence by this Vessell, which affects you so tenderly.__ I feel for you, more than I can or ought to express.__ Our Country has lost its most promising Character, in a manner however, that was worthy of her Cause.__ I can Say nothing more to you, but that you have much greater Reason to Say in this Case, a s a Duke of ormond said of an Earl of Ossory. ‘I would not exchange my Son for any living Son in the World.’"
-

John Adams to Henry Laurens, in a letter dated November 6, 1782

News of John Laurens’s death on August 27, 1782 was enclosed in this letter.  On November 12, 1782, Henry Laurens replied with the following:

For the rest, the Wound is deep, but I apply to myself the consolation which I administered to the Father, of the Brave Colonel Parker.  ‘Thank God I had a Son who dared to die in defence of his Country.’

(via john-laurens)

(via publius-esquire)

thesakinesama:

Oh God…I’m sorry…*snicker*

thesakinesama:

Oh God…I’m sorry…*snicker*

35 Founding Father Quotes Conservative Christians Will Hate

awomaninvisible:

Fascinating. This is what the US is supposed to be like. 

(I should point out, I’m not American, but the article is)

All these quotes look accurate. I’m seeing some I’d never seen before, though, which is neat.

Don’t mistake the Founders for a bunch of hardcore atheists who hated religion, though. This is why it’s hard to compare religious issues today to those of their time. Christianity was woven deeply into the culture, and pretty much everyone, Deist or not, went to church.

And after Thomas Paine wrote this ill-advised pamphlet…

31. “Persecution is not an original feature in any religion; but it is always the strongly marked feature of all religions established by law. Take away the law-establishment, and every religion re-assumes its original benignity.”
~Thomas Paine, The Rights of Man, 1791

Just about everyone hated him.

But yeah, the separation of church and state thing is one of my favorite things about the US! Remember a great account from a French guy, talking about how even family members might go to different churches and it wasn’t a big deal. Yay for religious diversity.

bluewhaleskeleton:

foundingfatherfest:

bluewhaleskeleton:

foundingfatherfest:

motherfuckingladyknight:

If the Founding Fathers could look at America today, they’d be horribly disappointed- namely because slavery’s been abolished and women, POC, and the poor can vote and run for office. So excuse me if I don’t give a flying fuck what they’d think about socialized medicine, gun control, or same-sex marriage.

Most of the Founders were anti-slavery. They just weren’t anti-slavery enough to do much about it. So I think they’d be pretty pleased about that.

Not going to dispute the other assertions.

It’s worthwhile to acknowledge that they created a framework flexible enough to withstand all those changes made since their era (14th Amendment, 19th Amendment, Civil Rights Act of 1964 etc.)

Meeeeh I guess. *shrugs*

It’s important to be aware of context. They were most impressive within the context of their time and perspective, putting the ideals of the Enlightenment into practice on a large scale for the first time.

And important thing to remember when it comes to social justice: no one is perfect, especially people who lived in what we might consider ‘backward’ times. We can’t impose our own standards on those in the past and expect historical figures to live up to them.

But that doesn’t mean we should pretend gross immoralities like slavery weren’t a big deal, either.

As long as a balance can be struck between acknowledging the ways in which historical figures like the Founders were exceptional while also acknowledging the ways in which they failed/were disappointing

It sounds so obvious when it’s put that way. Which makes me wonder why no one does it.

Pro-tip to everyone: before you start wailing about how some is villainizing the Founders or white-washing the Founders, check to make sure that’s what they’re actually doing.

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